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Argentinian Food: 13 Must-Try Traditional Dishes of Argentina

Argentinian Food: 13 Must-Try Traditional Dishes of Argentina

Occupying much of the South West tip of South America, Argentina stands as the 8th largest country in the world in terms of landmass. With magnificent mountains, beaches, waterfalls and landscapes along with a rich cultural history, a burning passion for football and wine, this latin-American country is among the most visited tourist destinations on the continent.

Argentina is culturally diverse, with people of many ethnicities calling it home. The ethnic profile of its population goes back to the 19th and 20th centuries when many Spanish and Italians immigrated here. The influx of immigrants between 1853 and 1955 was even surprisingly greater than the United States. 

Most Popular Argentinian Dishes

The influence of other nationalities in Argentinian culture is undeniable and can be experienced first-hand in its gastronomy. Argentinian cuisine is influenced by a blend of different cultures, from French to Spanish, Italian, Mesopotamian and more.

Argentinians are big consumers of red meat, with beef being one of the most popular. Beef is in fact the biggest industry in Argentina, along with poultry. So without further ado, here are the most popular Argentinian dishes along with links to our favorite recipes to try for yourself.

Asado (Barbecue)

Asado

It is impossible to not talk about asado when discussing Argentinian food. Asado is to Argentina what barbecue is to the rest of the world. It is a national staple that is generally served during a gathering of friends and family over the open grill with delicious barbecued meats and drinks.

A variety of meat, including typical beef cuts such as bife de lomo (tenderloin), bife de chorizo (sirloin), ham and sausages make it to the grill. The raw flavor of meat, well-seasoned with salt and pepper and accompanied by salads or fries, is an absolute treat! Asado is also widely enjoyed throughout neighboring Uruguay.

Our favorite Asado recipe.

Empanadas

Empanada

A common street food in Argentina, empanadas are pastry pockets made of wheat dough that are typically stuffed with flavourful minced beef, pork, chicken or ham along with cheese and vegetables.

They are seasoned with spices such as chilli salt and cumin. The pastry is then fried (or baked), becoming the perfect comfort food.

Our favorite Empanadas recipe.

Provoleta

Provoleta

Provoleta is heaven for cheese lovers! Exhibiting the obvious influences of Italian cuisine, its preparation involves a big portion of provolone (Italian aged cheese) slapped into a skillet and melted over heat. 

It is cooked until a perfect consistency of gooey cheesiness on the inside and crispness on the outside is achieved. Provoleta is served with a sprinkle of oregano, crushed red pepper and a drizzle of olive oil to boost the flavors.

Our favorite Provoleta recipe.

Chimichurri

Chimichurri

A staple side to all Asado barbeques, a table condiment and a common marinade, the chimichurri is an uncooked, green colored sauce that is made of finely chopped parsley, cloves of garlic minced, olive oil, dried oregano, chilli pepper and vinegar. 

For chimichurri rojo (red), red bell peppers and tomatoes are added to the green parsley base to give it its signature crimson color. The taste is both spicy and sour, but outrageously delicious.

Our favorite Chimichurri recipe.

Locro

Locro

Traditionally served on May 25 to commemorate the May revolution, Locro is unofficially considered as the national dish of Argentina. A cure to cold winters, this hearty stew is prepared with corn, potatoes, beans, red chorizo, beef or pork and is seasoned with salt and spices such as cumin or bay leaf.

It can be served with quiquirimichi (a spice consisting of ground chilli and paprika and chimichurri) and onion.

Our favorite Locro recipe.

Alfajores

Alfajores

Alfajores was brought to Argentina by the Spanish after it had been introduced to them by the Arabs in Europe. These cookies are shortbread-like biscuits that are sandwiched together with a dulce de leche filling. They are then coated with grated coconut and eaten throughout the year as a sweet snack.

Our favorite Alfajores recipe.

Tortas Fritas

Tortas Fritas

Tortas fritas are deep-fried dough snacks, tossed with sugar, popular in both Argentina and Uruguay. Whilst these sweet treats have been enjoyed for over 100 years and are typically made with milk and eggs then served with jam, sugar or dulce de leche.

Our favorite Tortas Fritas recipe.

Choripán

Choripán

Choripan is an Argentinian hot dog, considered to be the food of football. It is hard to miss on game nights as it is sold widely by street vendors and throughout stadiums.

Choripan is made of two main ingredients, chorizo (chori) and pan (bread). 

The sausage is cooked on the grill and is placed between a lightly grilled hot dog bun. To amplify the taste, it is often complimented with chimichurri. Some even serve it with caramelised onions, green peppers and other toppings.

Our favorite Choripán recipe.

Milanesa

Milanesa

This Argentinian take on schnitzel, made of beef instead of pork like the original Austrian schnitzel, was brought to Argentina by immigrants of Milan in Northern Italy. Basic milanesas are slices of meat that are breaded and marinated in beaten egg, a lot of garlic and parsley, and are then covered in breadcrumbs. 

A regular milanesa is coated with tomato sauce, plenty of cheese (mozzarella) and smoked ham or prosciutto (raw cured thin sliced Italian ham). This is among the most famous dishes in Argentina and is served with a rather generous portion of French fries or a salad.

Our favorite Milanesa Recipe.

Dulce de Leche

Dulce de Leche

An important and yet another example of strong Italian influence in Argentinian cuisine and culture is helado. The word is Spanish for ice-cream. It was embraced and improvised by the people to make their own version of an Italian gelato, Dulce de Leche.

Dulce de Leche is prepared with sweetened cow milk and is cooked slowly until it thickens and eventually caramelises. This drool-worthy sweetness is soft, creamy and smooth in texture and is widely used in other desserts and cakes as a dressing or for adding sweet flavor.

Our favorite Dulce de Leche recipe.

Yerba Mate

Yerba Mate

While the world drinks coffee, Argentina drinks Mate. This tea is at the heart of the cultural heritage of the Argentina and no home goes without a Mate with some snacks or just on its own. It is also a common practice to offer mate to strangers. 

Yerba mate has considerable caffeine. It is made from yerb, a herb that grows in the Mesopotamian area. Traditionally, it is sipped with a metal straw called bambilla and served in a gourd or a cup. 

Criadillas

Bull or calf testicle fries (criadillas)

Criadillas is one of the weirder foods eaten in Argentina. They are quite simply calf or bull testicles deep-fried.

Criadillas are commonly eaten in bullfighting regions of Argentina, paired with salsa and widely associated with the Matador after a bullfight who eats the testicles as a sign of strength. Sounds delicious, right?

Our favorite Criadillas recipe.

Medialunas

Medialunas

Medialunas is the Argentine equivalent of the French croissant, which of course was a very direct influence of French immigration to the country. However, unlike a regular croissant Medialunas are smaller and sweeter and enjoyed as a staple breakfast food.

Our favorite Medialunas recipe.

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